Tigers All-Decade Series: 2000s

maggy 2

From 1994 to 2005, the Tigers failed to have a winning record, including 2003’s dreadful 43-119 record. In 2006, new GM Dave Dombrowski hired a former manager of his for his 1997 Florida Marlins, Jim Leyland. Leyland led the Tigers to the World Series in 2006, but they lost to the St. Louis Cardinals.  Continue reading

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Tigers All-Decade Series: 1980s

Tram and Lou

Tigers’ greatest double-play combo, Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker

The Tigers achieved their fourth World Series championship in 1984 against the San Diego Padres. The “Roar of ’84” had a stellar group of players that are still held dearly in Detroit today. The 1984 World Championship remains the most recent championship for the Tigers, having failed to win it again in 31 years and counting. Continue reading

Tigers All-Decade Series: 1960s

Al Kaline

The Tigers won their third World Series title in the 1960s. In 1968, the Tigers defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in game seven. Led by AL MVP and Cy Young Denny McLain and World Series MVP Mickey Lolich, the Tigers’ rotation led the Tigers to their ninth AL pennant and third world championship in the franchise’s history. The next, and most recent, time they would win the World Series wouldn’t be for another sixteen years in 1984. Continue reading

Diamondbacks All-Decade Team: 1990s & 2000s

Randy_Johnson_04.jpg

For my first All-Decade post, I thought it would be best to write about my new hometown team (though NOT my favorite team…). The Arizona Diamondbacks started their first season in 1998, so instead of just writing about two years of baseball, I’m going to merge the 1990s and 2000s together in this post. Yes, I’m cheating right out of the gate, but you should really be pointing fingers at the Diamondbacks for starting their franchise at such an awkward time.

So here we go…

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Tigers All-Decade Team: 1930s

Greenberg

Now let’s fast-forward to the 1930s! the 1910s and 1920s were filled of mediocrity for the Detroit Tigers franchise. There were a few bright spots in the 1910s and 1920s though that I’d like to quickly hit on: George Mullin pitching the franchise’s first no-hitter, Cobb winning five consecutive batting titles, and the 100-win 1915 Tigers that narrowly lost the pennant to the Red Sox. But on to the 1930s and the Tigers’ first World Series championship! Continue reading